Teachers for Supply

Supply Teachers Blog

Category: Education (page 1 of 5)

How to use your TA effectively

A TA (teaching assistant) can be a massive help to a teacher in a classroom. As a teacher you may have a teaching assistant with you all the time or you may only have one for a limited number of days or hours per day. If the teaching assistant is higher level, they may be able to teach the class and cover if you are absent but this has not shown to have positive effects on pupils learning. A Ta should be used to aid the teacher not replace them and using a TA to work with low ability children also has not proven to be beneficial.

Ideally you will want to have time with your TA out of teaching time to discuss and plan future work. You need to ensure that your TA understands exactly what you need and expect of them and where the boundaries are.

You may want to use your TA to deliver one to one support or in a small group as long as this is overseen by yourself. Make sure that the TA has strict guidelines to follow and that you discuss with them the progress of the students on a regular basis.  

The TA can be useful when it comes to having a second opinion. They may be able to share their views how they would carry out a certain lesson which could prove beneficial.  

Sharing tips with other teachers

Teaching can be a very rewarding job but also it can be extremely stressful at times and this is why some teachers leave the profession after less than a year in the job. Planning lessons and homework can often be one of the many elements that contribute to stress in teaching. If you have a new subject or topic to teach, you may want advice or tips on how to cover the topic successfully. Other teachers often have great ideas and can offer you copies of their lesson plans or worksheets that they used when teaching a similar lesson. Although it is not a good idea to constantly use someone else’s planning, you can use this information to base your lesson plan on.
There are even teaching forums that you can sign up to which allows you to share ideas and notes / resources with other teachers to reduce the work load. These forums are not only a good way to share information but they can be a great network for support. You should never talk about an individual pupil or divulge sensitive information but you can ask generally questions on how you can deal with a certain behaviour etc.

Teaching tips for children with dyslexia

If you are a teacher then you will probably come in to contact with children with a range of learning difficulties. A very common learning difficult is dyslexia and can often go unnoticed for a number of years. Children who have dyslexia often confuse the use of small words such as does and goes and may find it hard to read single words in isolation. They often lack confidence and feel that they struggle to keep up with other members of the class. As a teacher, it is important that you give that child some of their confidence back and be mindful of their condition. You need to plan work that will help them whilst not putting too much pressure on them.
You need to give them praise for competing tasks to boost their self-esteem and if they do not wish to read out loud then this should be respected as often they may feel embarrassed which can aggravate a situation.
A person with dyslexia may be verbally very bright but struggle to put their words down on to paper. You may need to allow them a little more time to complete such tasks.

Starting your child’s education as a baby

For a lot of children when they start school is when their education starts and they begin without being able to read or write and will little understanding of counting and math. However, the children who have already started their education from an early age at home are given a much greater advantage in class and tend to advance much quicker than those with little to no past education experience.

So where do you start?

Studies show that you really can begin early with children as young as 6 months old. Simple exercises such as number recognition with blocks is a great place to start. Lay 3 blocks in a row, then stack 3 on top of each other, then place them on the floor in a pattern and show your child each time saying “there are 3 blocks” this teaches them what “3” looks like in physical terms, you can then try with different amounts of blocks.

Showing them written numbers from 1-10 will also help their understanding.

To help start their communication skills early it can be useful to attend baby signing classes, this teaches your baby a very basic form of a sign that they can use to communicate with you before their speech has developed. Generally, babies that learn to sign tend to speak much sooner and have a larger vocabulary.

So start early and make it a game that way learning new skills will be fun for both you and your child.

Knowing your duties as a teaching assistant

The job of a teaching assistant can vary depending on the school and the teacher you are working with. Each school, although having to adhere to strict guidelines, can still to an extent change some of the ways in which the school is run. If you have previously been a teaching assistant in a school and then move to another you may have to learn to work in a different way.

It is important early on to establish what your job role entails exactly so you do not overstep the mark with the teacher and also so you do not miss any important tasks that you should be doing.

You may be given task such as creating displays, organising worksheets, collecting and giving out books, hearing children read and possibly taking a small group of children to work with during lesson time. If there is a pupil who has learning difficulties then you may be responsible for working with them the majority of the time.

Some teaching assistants that have teaching experience may be asked to cover the class for a short period if the teacher is away on a course or off ill for example.

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