Teachers for Supply

Supply Teachers Blog

Category: Supply Teachers (page 1 of 38)

Time management advice for teachers

Teachers often complain of limited time and having far too much work to fit in their normal working day. For this reason almost all teachers have to work evenings and/or weekends to try and catch up. Time management is very important to ensure that you spend as little of your free time working, as possible. It is important to not only manage your time in your job, but also making sure that you have spare time for yourself, to do something you enjoy. Not allowing yourself time away from teaching, planning or marking can lead to stress and anxiety and can have an impact on your career but also your home life.

All teachers are now given something called PPA time which is supposed to be time in the classroom without the children, where they can mark or plan work. This can help to give teachers a head start but it is often not enough time to complete all of your work and you may find that it gets eaten up by other things such as meeting with parents or planning assemblies.

Try and plan days which you will work in the evening and days you will have off and do something with your friends or family.

Avoiding classroom coughs and colds as a teacher

As a teacher who is coming into contact with around 30 children a day its highly likely that at least one of those children (if not more!) will have coughs or colds and will be showing all the usual symptoms including runny noses, coughs, sore throats, eye infections and sickness. Continue reading

What are the advantages of supply teaching?

If you have recently qualified as a teacher then you may have the option to go in to supply teacher or a permanent position. Supply teaching has many advantages that may attract you to the position. You can either register with a teaching agency to find work or you can chose to go it alone. You will most likely need to register with the local councils to be put on the list of supply teachers.

One of the benefits of supply teaching is that you get the opportunity to work with children of all different ages. This will give you the experience you need and will also help you decide what year you would like to teach if you do decide to go for a permanent position further on down the line.

Supply teachers often get paid more per day that permanent teachers. This means that you may only have to work 3 days a week to make up the salary you would earn full time.

As a supply teacher you will have less responsibility, which attracts many people to the job. You often will not have to plan lessons as teachers usually plan the lessons in advance so you will be able to work off their lesson plan. You do need to bear in mind that you will not get paid through the holidays as a permanent teacher would, so have to budget your money accordingly.

 

Considering safety within your classroom

As a teacher, you have a duty of care to the pupils in your class. Their parents are putting their trust in you and it is important that you have their safety as a number one priority. When you are a teacher, especially if it is a large class, it is easy to become distracted by one pupil if they are in need of help or causing a distraction. When this happens you should be sure that you have a TA or another teacher on hand to help you should you need to leave the classroom or not be able to talk to other pupils. Schools are often understaffed due to budget restrictions, so you may not always have a TA with you. Many schools have a walkie-talkie system or phone system in place to allow you to contact other members of staff quickly should you need to.

When working with items that could be dangerous such as scissors for younger children or chemicals, you may decide to do this in smaller groups rather than a whole class activity. Set other work for the pupils to be getting on with and rotate the groups around so that everyone has a go. This will allow you to keep more control of the situation and access what is going on.

Returning to teaching after the summer holidays

If you are a teacher and have just had the six weeks off school then you will probably not be particularly looking forward to returning soon. Often teachers return to school a few days before the pupils do so that they have time to get their classrooms ready and to have meetings to find out about changes and updates that may affect them.

It is important to get yourself back into your normal work routine at least a few days before returning to work, so if you have enjoyed laying in until 10 am or heading off to bed at 2 am you may want to start to adjust slowly the week or so before you go back. This will allow your body clock time to adjust and get used to your sleep pattern again.

Rather than thinking about the negatives of returning to work, try and think positively and give yourself some goals as to what you want to achieve in the year to come. Making lists of to do tasks can help organise a cluttered mine. You may want to make daily or weekly ones as well as long-term lists for the next few months or year ahead.

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