Teachers for Supply

Supply Teachers Blog

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Time management advice for teachers

Teachers often complain of limited time and having far too much work to fit in their normal working day. For this reason almost all teachers have to work evenings and/or weekends to try and catch up. Time management is very important to ensure that you spend as little of your free time working, as possible. It is important to not only manage your time in your job, but also making sure that you have spare time for yourself, to do something you enjoy. Not allowing yourself time away from teaching, planning or marking can lead to stress and anxiety and can have an impact on your career but also your home life.

All teachers are now given something called PPA time which is supposed to be time in the classroom without the children, where they can mark or plan work. This can help to give teachers a head start but it is often not enough time to complete all of your work and you may find that it gets eaten up by other things such as meeting with parents or planning assemblies.

Try and plan days which you will work in the evening and days you will have off and do something with your friends or family.

Sharing tips with other teachers

Teaching can be a very rewarding job but also it can be extremely stressful at times and this is why some teachers leave the profession after less than a year in the job. Planning lessons and homework can often be one of the many elements that contribute to stress in teaching. If you have a new subject or topic to teach, you may want advice or tips on how to cover the topic successfully. Other teachers often have great ideas and can offer you copies of their lesson plans or worksheets that they used when teaching a similar lesson. Although it is not a good idea to constantly use someone else’s planning, you can use this information to base your lesson plan on.
There are even teaching forums that you can sign up to which allows you to share ideas and notes / resources with other teachers to reduce the work load. These forums are not only a good way to share information but they can be a great network for support. You should never talk about an individual pupil or divulge sensitive information but you can ask generally questions on how you can deal with a certain behaviour etc.

Teaching tips for children with dyslexia

If you are a teacher then you will probably come in to contact with children with a range of learning difficulties. A very common learning difficult is dyslexia and can often go unnoticed for a number of years. Children who have dyslexia often confuse the use of small words such as does and goes and may find it hard to read single words in isolation. They often lack confidence and feel that they struggle to keep up with other members of the class. As a teacher, it is important that you give that child some of their confidence back and be mindful of their condition. You need to plan work that will help them whilst not putting too much pressure on them.
You need to give them praise for competing tasks to boost their self-esteem and if they do not wish to read out loud then this should be respected as often they may feel embarrassed which can aggravate a situation.
A person with dyslexia may be verbally very bright but struggle to put their words down on to paper. You may need to allow them a little more time to complete such tasks.

Avoiding classroom coughs and colds as a teacher

As a teacher who is coming into contact with around 30 children a day its highly likely that at least one of those children (if not more!) will have coughs or colds and will be showing all the usual symptoms including runny noses, coughs, sore throats, eye infections and sickness. Continue reading

What are the advantages of supply teaching?

If you have recently qualified as a teacher then you may have the option to go in to supply teacher or a permanent position. Supply teaching has many advantages that may attract you to the position. You can either register with a teaching agency to find work or you can chose to go it alone. You will most likely need to register with the local councils to be put on the list of supply teachers.

One of the benefits of supply teaching is that you get the opportunity to work with children of all different ages. This will give you the experience you need and will also help you decide what year you would like to teach if you do decide to go for a permanent position further on down the line.

Supply teachers often get paid more per day that permanent teachers. This means that you may only have to work 3 days a week to make up the salary you would earn full time.

As a supply teacher you will have less responsibility, which attracts many people to the job. You often will not have to plan lessons as teachers usually plan the lessons in advance so you will be able to work off their lesson plan. You do need to bear in mind that you will not get paid through the holidays as a permanent teacher would, so have to budget your money accordingly.

 

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